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Training & Teaching

GP Registrars

For a period of six months or a year, a GP registrar joins the practice and are available for consultation.  He or she will be a fully qualified doctor who will have worked in the hospital, and will be gaining the experience required to become a general practitioner. 

Medical Students

This practice supports University of East Anglia Medical School and the University of Cambridge Medical School, in the teaching and training of medical students at different points during their course.

  

Medical Students - Why are we involved in training medical students?

The surgery works in collaboration with the University of East Anglia to help train the next generation of doctors.  We feel that teaching increases standards and produces a higher quality service for everyone.  We know it is important for tomorrow's doctors to understand all about what it means to be unwell.

What do patients think about becoming involved?

Most people who have taken part in student teaching in the past have enjoyed it.  They find that they learn things themselves as well as helping the students learn.

How do they learn to be doctors?

From the beginning students will be coming to general practices or to hospitals to learn by meeting patients.  Every week the students are given "learning aims" to work on at the university and the days they spend with patients link in with the topic being studied.  As well as learning about the theory, they will be learning from patients about how being will affects daily life and life in the community.

A teaching day at the GP practice

In each training practice one or two of the GPs have been trained to be a tutor for the students and will co-ordinate their learning for the day.

The GP tutor will have already organised for patients to come to talk to either a pair of students or the whole group.

They may also have arranged for pairs of students to take part in different activities which can include:

  • some research in the practice library or on the practice computers
  • visiting someone at home

All members of the team may be involved in student learning activities as all have valuable skills to teach them.

This may be at the surgery or out in the community.

All these learning activities are valuable and will give them insight into different aspects of what it is to be ill.  The day will end with a group discussion about what they have learned.

If you are invited to take part in in a learning activity we will make sure you understand exactly what is involved.  We will always ask your permission and only want you to agree if you are completely happy.  Saying no will not prejudice your care at the surgery in any way. 

Confidentiality is something we feel is important and we are taking it very seriously.  Please read our confidentiality leaflet for more information. Confidentiality Leaflet.pdf

How much time will it take me?
  • If you have agreed to make a special appointment to meet the students, it should take no longer than an hour.
  • If you are seeing them as part of your normal appointment, please allow up to half an hour.
What will I have to do?

Before you meet the students the GP tutor or member of the practice team will discuss what will happen so you will know what to expect.  Sometimes the GP tutor will sit in and at other times the students will speak to you on their own.

They will be interested in what has been happening to you or the adult or child that you care for.

Your views matter

We feel it is very important to get your views after the teaching and learning experience.  This will help us improve it next time for the GP tutors, students and other patients.  Please could you fill in and return any feedback forms you may be given.

If you would like to take part in the student teaching programme at Trinity & Bowthorpe Medical Practice please contact your GP or the Medical Student Teaching Co-ordinator.



 
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