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Appointments

There are a mixture of pre-bookable and same day appointments each day. What does this mean and how do you book these appointments?

Pre-bookable

  • If you have been asked to make a medication review appointment on your repeat prescription.
  • The doctor has requested a follow up appointment.
  • Nurse or phlebotomy appointments.
  • Extended hours service available on Saturday mornings for pre-booked appointments for patients who find it difficult to attend the surgery during normal working hours.  This service is held at Bowthorpe Health Centre and is also available to Trinity Street patients.
  • If your appointment is pre-bookable please ring after 10.00 or in the afternoon from 15.00 onwards and we will endeavour to book an appointment with your usual doctor.

Same day (Bowthorpe Health Centre)

  • Please phone 748043 from 08.30 to make a same day appointment.
  • You will speak to a receptionist who will ask you a few questions to identify the nature of your problem before booking you in with a doctor or the nurse practitioner. 
  • It is our aim to offer you a timed appointment that day.
  • If you do not need to see a clinician and your problem can be dealt with over the telephone, please ask for a telephone consultation.

Same day (Trinity Street Surgery)

  • Please phone 624844 from 08.30 to make a same day appointment.
  • You will speak to a receptionist who will ask you a few questions to identify the nature of your problem before booking you in with a doctor.
  • It is our aim to offer you a timed appointment that day.
  • If you do not need to see a clinician and your problem can be dealt with over the telephone, please ask for a telephone consultation.

Book Appointments Online

  • You may book appointments online via the link at the top of this page.

Telephone Advice

The doctors can give advice over the telephone and if they are not available when you call we will take your details and a doctor will ring you back.

If we have no more appointments available you will be offered a telephone consultation if you feel it is urgent to be dealt with that day.

Why does the Receptionist need to ask what's wrong with me?

It is not a case of the receptionist being nosey!

The reception staff are members of the practice team and it has been agreed that it is appropriate that they should ask patients 'why they need to be seen'.  Reception staff are trained to ask certain questions in order to ensure that you receive:

  • The most appropriate medical care,
  • from the most appropriate health professional,
  • at the most appropriate time.

Receptionists are asked to collect brief information from patients:

  • To help doctors prioritise house visits and phone calls.
  • To ensure that all patients receive the appropriate level of care.
  • To direct patients to see the nurse or other health professional rather than a doctor where appropriate.

Reception staff, like all members of the team, are bound by confidentiality rules:

  • Any information given by you is treated in the strictest confidence.
  • The Practice would take any breach of confidentiality very seriously and deal with accordingly.
  • You can speak to a receptionist in private away from reception.
  • However, if you feel an issue is very private and do not wish to say what this is then this will be respected.

Thank you for your support.

Chaperones      

There will be times when your doctor or nurse will suggest you need an intimate examination as part of your consultation and will explain the reason for this. If you would like a chaperone present at any examination then please make this known at the time; the doctor or nurse will quite understand your request.

We will arrange for a nurse or a receptionist to be available or if you prefer you may ask a relative or a friend to be present.

Making the most of your appointment

GPs spend an average of 8-10 minutes with each patient.  Once you've got an appointment, plan ahead to make sure you cover everything you want to discuss.

Before you see the GP, write a list of problems, starting with the most important.  List your symptoms, so you don't forget them.  Write down when they started and what makes them better or worse during a 24-hour period.  If you have a complicated problem, ask for a longer appointment when you book. 

You can bring a friend or relative if you're worried.

Be honest about what you think may be causing the problem, and don't be embarrassed.  Your doctor will have seen and heard it all before.

Be clear about what you want the GP to do, such as refer you to a specialist or prescribe a different medication.  Be assertive if you need to, but always be polite. 

Ask the GP to repeat and explain anything you don't understand.  If there are words you don't understand, ask what they mean or get the doctor to write them down, so you can look them up later.

If you and your GP decide you need to be referred for specialist tests or treatment, you usually have a right to choose which hospital and/or consultant led-team you go to. 

You might also find these articles What to ask the doctor and Can I speak to a GP about someone else's health of interest.

Cancellations & Missed Appointments

Did you know... during August 2017 there were 121 missed appointments at this practice.  This amounts to 12.1 hours of wasted clinician time. 

We need your help!  If you cannot attend your appointment for any reason please inform us as soon as possible in order for us to give the slot to someone else. 

Thank you

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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